important sentences

6/5/2018 9:48:21 PM
Gravatar
Total Posts 105

important sentences

6/5/2018 9:52:22 PM
Gravatar
Total Posts 105

Re: important sentences

 

subject  , result  action V2  from   reason action ore reason situation

 

he collapsed from loss of blood

he got happy from her presence

6/23/2018 10:04:16 AM
Gravatar
Total Posts 105

Re: important sentences

There used to be a playground at the end of the street.

6/23/2018 10:13:45 AM
Gravatar
Total Posts 105

Re: important sentences

to introduce people:

This is Janet.
These are my friends, John and Michael.

WARNING:
We don’t say These are John and Michael.
We say This is John and this is Michael.

6/23/2018 10:16:44 AM
Gravatar
Total Posts 105

Re: important sentences

Why do we use that and those?

We use that (singular) and those (plural):

- to talk about things that are not near us:

What’s that?
This is our house, and that’s Rebecca’s house over there.
Those are very expensive shoes.

6/23/2018 10:24:08 AM
Gravatar
Total Posts 105

Re: important sentences

Let’s look at the photographs. The ones you took in Paris.

6/23/2018 10:40:40 AM
Gravatar
Total Posts 105

Re: important sentences

Questions with prepositions:

Questions ending in prepositions are very common in English. After WhoWhich or What we often have a preposition at the end of the sentence:

Who does this book belong to?
What are you looking for?
Which university did you go to?
What country do you come from?

6/23/2018 11:22:25 AM
Gravatar
Total Posts 105

Re: important sentences

We use whose to ask about possession:

Whose coat is this? [or] Whose is this coat?
Whose book is that? [or] Whose is that book?
Whose bags are those? [or] Whose are those bags?

6/23/2018 11:33:53 AM
Gravatar
Total Posts 105

Re: important sentences

 

We sent each other Christmas cards.

They didn’t look at one another.

We also use the possessive forms each other’s and one another’s:

They helped to look after each other’s children.
We often stayed in one another’s houses.

6/23/2018 11:40:17 AM
Gravatar
Total Posts 105

indefinite pronouns

We use a singular verb after an indefinite pronoun:

Everybody loves Sally.
Everything was ready for the party.

When we refer back to an indefinite pronoun we normally use a plural pronoun:

Everybody enjoyed the concert. They stood up and clapped.
I will tell somebody that dinner is ready. They have been waiting a long time.

We can add -'s to an indefinite pronoun to make a possessive.

They were staying in somebody’s house.
Is this anybody’s coat?

We use indefinite pronouns with no- as the subject in negative clauses (not pronouns with any.)

Anybody didn’t come >> Nobody came.

We do not use another negative in a clause with nobodyno one or nothing:

Nobody came.
Nothing happened.